DAWCast: Episode 2 - Adorable AndrewEpisode 2 of the David Andrew Wiebe Interviews and Music Business Podcast introduces us to David’s alter-ego, “Adorable Andrew”. Tune in to hear the “Adorable Andrew Theme”, another studio tip of the day, and learn more about NES music and chiptunes.

Credits:

  • MUSIC: “Adorable Andrew Theme”, David Andrew Wiebe © 2009

Listeners:

Video:

You can also enjoy this episode in video format.

Transcription:

Introduction

This is David Andrew Wiebe Podcast episode #2 for August 4, 2009. Hi, I’m David Andrew Wiebe and I’d like to thank you for tuning in. In the last episode I talked a little bit about Project 365 and what that entailed. Today I’d like to talk more about recent developments in my music.

Arctic Sunburn

Now some of you may be aware that I have a website called Arctic Sunburn. You can find it at www.arcticsunburn.com. That’s a-r-c-t-i-c sunburn dot com. I will also put a link in the show notes which you can find at daw-music.com [editor’s note: the show notes have been relocated; you are currently looking at the show notes].

Arctic Sunburn is all about video games and movies, and I have several dozen reviews posted on the site. Recently I decided to venture out and started making video content for the site as well. For my videos I adopted an alternate persona known as Adorable Andrew. I decided that this Adorable Andrew needed a musical theme of his own, so I wrote a NES inspired theme, simply titled the “Adorable Andrew Theme”.

Originally it was just a MIDI composition but I decided to mess around with it in FL Studio. This is the first time I’ve really done anything with FL Studio so my ability to use the program is somewhat suspect. But here it is – the “Adorable Andrew Theme”.

Music

“Adorable Andrew Theme”, David Andrew Wiebe © 2009

Video Game Music

Thanks again for tuning in to the David Andrew Wiebe Podcast. You just heard the “Adorable Andrew Theme” which I wrote earlier this summer. One of my major influences for this track was the music from Mega Man. I feel like Mega Man had some of the best music of any game in the NES age. What are some of your favorites? Feel free to send an email and let me know. You can reach me at david@davidandrewwiebe.com [editor’s note: please direct all feedback to comments@daw-music.com].

Studio Tip of the Day

And now it’s time for another studio tip of the day. Well, actually, it’s more like “tip of the month” since this podcast only comes out once a month, but in any case, here’s another tip for guitarists and bassists.

Before recording tracks in the studio, I would advise getting your guitar set up by a professional. Get the intonation checked, and have new strings put on. If at all possible, get the same tech to handle all of your instruments at once to ensure consistency between them. I tend to play both bass and guitar in the studio, so it’s really important for the instruments to be in tune with each other. I have had to go back and record several tracks, simply because one of the instruments wasn’t in tune. Always keep a tuner handy, and remember to get your instruments set up a couple time of year. This is all the more important if you live in a part of the world where the weather tends to change a lot. I live in Calgary and the weather goes from really cold to really hot so I find it helpful to get my instruments set up a few times a year.

Conclusion

And now we’re coming to the close of another episode but feel free to send me feedback to david@davidandrewwiebe.com [editor’s note: please use comments@daw-music.com]. Thanks for listening.

You’ve been listening to the David Andrew Wiebe Podcast, broadcasting from Calgary, Alberta.

Reflecting on #002: Adorable Andrew:

As I look back, I can see that summer 2009 was a particularly productive time in my life for creative projects. I spent quite a bit of time making videos for my Arctic Sunburn YouTube Channel (Arctic Sunburn is now AS Movies & Games), and as result, I wrote several new compositions to go along with the videos. I was just starting to produce podcast episodes around this time as well.

I had no idea how much that YouTube channel would catch on. For what was essentially a few months’ effort, I amassed about 60 subscribers and nearly 75,000 upload views (as of February 2013). Not monumental, but nothing to sneeze at either. There is definitely something to be said for long-term results.

Having realized this, I started making more videos for this channel again recently. Realistically I know I won’t be able to sustain regular uploads, but it’s a fun side project and I will likely continue to create more content for it.

While I still find myself composing in MIDI, the days of loading up FL Studio and finding plugins for each track are essentially over. In the last year I’ve found a new studio workflow that works really well for me, and has enabled me to do more in the studio than I’d ever imagined possible.

This episode featured another Studio Tip of the Day. I have mentioned this before, but at the time I thought it could be one way of providing added value to my listeners. It did not remain as a long-term strategy, however. You won’t hear any new episodes with studio tips.

If the podcast had continued with this format, it may never have evolved to the point that it has. Change was coming fast.

Author: David Andrew Wiebe

David Andrew Wiebe has built an extensive career in songwriting, live performance, recording, session playing, production work, investing, and music instruction. In addition to helping musicians unlock their full potential, he also continues to maintain a touring schedule with multiple bands.

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